Is postdating a check illegal in alaska

(a) A person commits the crime of theft in the second degree if the person commits theft as defined in AS and (1) the value of the property or services is 0 or more but less than ,000; (2) the property is a firearm or explosive; (3) the property is taken from the person of another; (4) the property is taken from a vessel and is vessel safety or survival equipment; (5) the property is taken from an aircraft and the property is aircraft safety or survival equipment; (6) the value of the property is or more but less than 0 and, within the preceding five years, the person has been convicted and sentenced on two or more separate occasions in this or another jurisdiction of (A) an offense under AS , or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; (B) a crime set out in this subsection or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; (C) an offense under AS (a)(1), or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; or (D) an offense under AS (c)(1) or (c)(2)(A), or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; or (7) the property is an access device. (a) A person commits the crime of theft in the third degree if the person commits theft as defined in AS and (1) the value of the property or services is or more but less than 0; (2) (3) the value of the property is less than and, within the past five years, the person has been convicted and sentenced on two or more separate occasions in this or another jurisdiction of theft or concealment of merchandise, or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements. (b) Theft in the fourth degree is a class B misdemeanor. The files making up this Internet version of the State Codes do not constitute the official text of the State Codes and are intended for informational purposes only. (a) A person commits the crime of theft in the fourth degree if the person commits theft as defined in AS and the value of the property or services is less than . (b) As used in this section "reasonable measures" includes notifying the identified owner or a peace officer. (c) As used in this section, "deception" has the meaning ascribed to it in AS but does not include falsity as to matters having no pecuniary significance or "puffing" by statements unlikely to deceive reasonable persons in the group addressed. (c) In a prosecution based on theft by failure to make required disposition of funds received or held, the fact that the defendant was a fiduciary or an officer or employee of a government or a financial institution is prima facie evidence (1) that the defendant exercised control over property or services as the defendant's own if the defendant failed to pay or account upon lawful demand or if an audit reveals a shortage or falsification of accounts; and (2) that the defendant knew any legal obligation relevant under (a)(1) of this section. (c) Concealment of merchandise is (1) a class C felony if (A) the merchandise is a firearm; (B) the value of the merchandise is 0 or more; or (C) the value of the merchandise is or more but less than 0 and, within the preceding five years, the person has been convicted and sentenced on two or more separate occasions in this or another jurisdiction of (i) the offense of concealment of merchandise under this paragraph or (2)(A) of this subsection, or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; or (ii) an offense under AS , , or (a)(1), or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; (2) a class A misdemeanor if (A) the value of the merchandise is or more but less than 0; or (B) the value of the merchandise is less than and, within the preceding five years, the person has been convicted and sentenced on two or more separate occasions of the offense of concealment of merchandise or theft in any degree, or an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements; (3) a class B misdemeanor if the value of the merchandise is less than . The code that is provided on this site is an unofficial posting of the State Codes.

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(b) In this section, (1) "aircraft" means a contrivance used or designed for navigation of flight in air; (2) "aircraft safety or survival equipment" means equipment required to be carried on an aircraft under AS ; (3) "vessel" means every description of watercraft, other than a seaplane on water, used or capable of being used as a means of transportation on water; (4) "vessel safety or survival equipment" means personal flotation devices; immersion suits; personal flotation device lights; survival craft; equipment necessary for the proper operation of survival craft; emergency position indicating radio beacons; fire extinguishers and supporting equipment; firefighters' outfits; and self contained breathing apparatuses; in this paragraph, "survival craft" means a device designed to enable a person to survive the loss of a vessel, and includes buoyant apparatuses, inflatable buoyant apparatuses, life floats, inflatable life rafts, and auxiliary craft, including skiffs, usable as survival craft. (b) Theft in the third degree is a class A misdemeanor. No representation is made as to the accuracy or completeness of these sections.

(a) A person commits theft of services if (1) the person obtains services, known by that person to be available only for compensation, by deception, force, threat, or other means to avoid payment for the services; (2) having control over the disposition of services of others to which the person is not entitled, the person knowingly diverts those services to the person's own benefit or to the benefit of another not entitled to them; or (3) the person obtains the use of computer time, a computer system, a computer program, a computer network, or any part of a computer system or network, with reckless disregard that the use by that person is unauthorized. (a) A person commits the crime of removal of identification marks if, with intent to cause interruption to the ownership of another, the person defaces, erases, or otherwise alters or attempts to deface, erase, or otherwise alter any serial number or identification mark placed or inscribed on a propelled vehicle, bicycle, firearm, movable or immovable construction tool or equipment, appliance, merchandise, or other article or its component parts. (b) Unlawful possession is (1) a class C felony if the value of the property on which the serial number or identification mark appeared is $500 or more; (2) a class A misdemeanor if the value of the property on which the serial number or identification mark appeared is $50 or more but less than $500; (3) a class B misdemeanor if the value of the property on which the serial number or identification mark appeared is less than $50. (c) In this section, (1) "amount due" means the face amount of the dishonored check plus all costs and protest fees assessed by the drawee; (2) "check" means a draft, check, or similar sight order for the payment of money, but does not include a postdated check or a promissory note; (3) a person "issues" a check when as a drawer the person delivers it or causes it to be delivered to a person who thereby acquires a right against the drawer with respect to the check; a person who draws a check with the intent that it be so delivered is considered to have issued it if the delivery occurs. (b) Fraudulent use of an access device is (1) a class B felony if the value of the property or services obtained is $25,000 or more; (2) a class C felony if the value of the property or services obtained is $50 or more but less than $25,000; (3) a class A misdemeanor if the value of the property or services obtained is less than $50. (a) A person commits the crime of obtaining an access device or identification document by fraudulent means if (1) the person buys an access device or identification document from a person other than the issuer or, as other than the issuer, the person sells an access device or identification document; (2) with intent to defraud, the person obtains an access device or identification document; or (3) with intent to defraud, the person makes a false statement in an application for an access device or identification document. Disclaimer Please note, the theft law information on this page is provided as a courtesy to help explain theft, shoplifting and stealing laws.

(a) A person commits the crime of unlawful possession if the person possesses a propelled vehicle, bicycle, firearm, movable or immovable construction tool or equipment, appliance, merchandise or other article or its component parts knowing that the serial number or identification mark placed on it by the manufacturer or owner for the purpose of identification has been defaced, erased, or otherwise altered with the intent of causing interruption to the ownership of another. (b) In a prosecution under this section, it is prima facie evidence that the drawer knew the check would not be honored by the drawee if (1) payment of the check was refused by the drawee for lack of funds upon presentation within 30 days after issue, and the drawer failed to make full satisfaction of the amount due within 15 days after notice of dishonor was deposited as first class mail, addressed to the drawer at the address appearing on the dishonored check or the drawer's last known address; or (2) the drawer had no account with the drawee at the time the check was issued. (a) A person commits the crime of fraudulent use of an access device if, with intent to defraud, the person uses an access device to obtain property or services with knowledge that (1) the access device is stolen or forged; (2) the access device is expired or has been revoked or cancelled; or (3) for any other reason, that person's use of the access device is unauthorized by either the issuer or the person to whom the access device is issued. Obtaining an access device or identification document by fraudulent means. For purposes of considering prior convictions in prosecuting a crime of theft under AS (a)(6) or (a)(3), or in prosecuting the crime of concealment of merchandise under AS (c), a conviction for an offense under another law or ordinance with similar elements is a conviction of an offense having elements similar to those of an offense defined as such under Alaska law at the time the offense was committed.

Offender Solutions is a professional online education service for juveniles and adults. Consolidation of theft offenses: Pleading and proof. (c) Theft in the second degree is a class C felony. While every effort was made to ensure the accuracy and completeness of the statutes available Offender Solutions T shall not be liable or held responsible for any errors or omissions which may occur in these files, they are provided on an "As Is" basis.

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